17 April 2014

9 Reasons a Leader Should Use Groups in Decision Making [Guest Post]

This guest post by Shaun Rosenberg highlights the importance for a leader of involving the team or group in the decision-making process, thereby helping them to grow as well.  He is the author of the Shaun Rosenberg Blog.  His blog is for everyone looking to change for the better.  He writes about personal growth and motivation.

As a leader you make decisions about yourself, your direction, and possibly the direction of other people around you. Sometimes these decisions are pretty challenging to make by yourself.  You often don’t always know which road to go down.

Wrong decisions can be costly and because you are a leader, it often affects not only yourself, but the people you lead as well. It’s tough, but luckily you don’t always have to make these decisions on your own.  As the leader, it is good leadership practice to involve your team members as often as you can in making difficult decisions.

9 Reasons Why a Leader Should Use Groups to Help making Decisions

1. It Helps the Leader with Diversified Viewpoints

The great thing about groups is everyone brings their own viewpoint into the discussion.

For instance, if you are a company looking for a new product, the marketing people, the accountants, and the product designers will all have different opinions on what is important.  Bringing together the different points of view will help you create a product with market feasibility at the right price with high sales potential.

2. The Leader Brings Together Different Skills and Knowledge

The power of working with a team lies in the fact that each team member contributes their unique knowledge and skills, making the whole thought process much richer and providing different angles from which to view the decision you have to make.  The key to success in today’s new economy is collaboration.  Bringing people with different viewpoints together increase your potential for success exponentially.

3. It Gives Us More Potential Solutions to The Problem

Brainstorm for solutions by yourself and you may find a few that could work. Multiply that by 4 or 5 people and the possibilities are nearly endless. Different people looking at a problem from different viewpoints means there will be more ideas on how to solve those problems. Just because you think you know the answer doesn’t mean somebody else can’t come up with a better option. The only way to know is by participating in groups.

4. It Helps the Leader Make Sure All The Details Are Met

When you make a decision on what to do, it is easy to overlook some of the details that come with that decision. When you involve a group it can help you to not only remember the minor details you need to focus on, but also help you focus on areas you may have not even known was an issue.

5. It Reduces the Bias of the Leader

Even the best of us have our own biases and opinions. We may have a biased mind when we decide things such as who to vote for, who our friends will be, what brand of toilet paper we buy, and even how we phrase the questions we ask.

Making assumptions based on your bias can have very negative consequences if you use them for important decisions that can affect your life.

No one person is immune to having a bias.  The best thing you can do is to try to eliminate your  bias by including your multidisciplinary.  Listening to 2 sets of opposing opinions can help you to make a better decision than just listening to one.

6. It Puts Your Mind At Ease

Sometimes we need to make difficult decisions like letting someone go or kicking out a tenant. Even when you know the right thing to do, it isn’t always easy. By making the decision as a group it is much easier to follow through with the plan because it wasn’t just your opinion, it included opinions from a variety of people.

7. It Lets You Talk About The Problem

Sometimes we just need to talk about the problem with another person in order to find the right solution. Making a decision as a group allows you to do just that. You’ll feel better by voicing all of your concerns and visions and to get other’s viewpoints on them.

8. It Makes Generates Buy-in

When people feel like they had a say in deciding what happens, they will buy into the goal or outcome.  This is especially important when the people you involve in the decision making process are the ones who are going to execute the plan.  By involving your team and letting them gave a say in the decision creates commitment and help people to follow through on the decision.

9. It Makes People More Responsible

People who have the chance to get their voice heard will take more responsibility and will work harder than people who don’t.

Peter Parker better known as Spiderman got this advice from his uncle.  He said: “With great power comes great responsibility.”

The Value of Groups for a Leader

Groups can be a wonderful tool to help you make big decisions in life, but when time management is important  you have to guide the process very efficiently as the leader.  Involving groups in the decision making process can be time-consuming if not managed well.  It is however a very effective decision-making model available to a leader.

Groups give you insight and be extremely valuable when making big decisions in life.  This make groups a wonderful tool to help improve your decisions, your life, and the lives of people around you.

In the end that is what being a leader is really about.

 

Written by Stephan De Villiers

Stephan De Villiers 9 Reasons a Leader Should Use Groups in Decision Making [Guest Post]

I have a passion for people & leadership development and since I discovered my mom’s old typewriter as a boy, I have written in some form or another.
I started blogging in 2010 and in August 2011, I started The Leadership Connexion with the aim to make the connection between Business, Leadership and Life. My professional experience span across various business disciplines, including Training, Project Management, Human Resource Management and Finance. I have a MBA degree, am co-founder a Industrial Water Treatment Company and lecture International Business at Monash SA University.
I am part of the Leadership for The International Mentoring Network (IMN), South African Chapter, where I am a regular Idea Studio Facilitator and Annual IMN Conference Speaker. I believe that the highest form of living is using what you are blessed with to add value to other people’s lives.

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About Stephan De Villiers

I have a passion for people & leadership development and since I discovered my mom’s old typewriter as a boy, I have written in some form or another.
I started blogging in 2010 and in August 2011, I started The Leadership Connexion with the aim to make the connection between Business, Leadership and Life. My professional experience span across various business disciplines, including Training, Project Management, Human Resource Management and Finance. I have a MBA degree, am co-founder a Industrial Water Treatment Company and lecture International Business at Monash SA University.
I am part of the Leadership for The International Mentoring Network (IMN), South African Chapter, where I am a regular Idea Studio Facilitator and Annual IMN Conference Speaker. I believe that the highest form of living is using what you are blessed with to add value to other people’s lives.

Comments

  1. Hi Mr Rosenberg,

    Thank you for your post; it is very interesting and comprehensive.

    I couldn’t agree more with the 9 reasons. What interests me more is point no. 9, making people more responsible. I have noticed lately that people insist increasingly more on leader (be it politician, manager or whatever) accountability but often forget about their own individual accountability. It reminds me of those cases of persons attacked in the street in front of many witnesses who did not move a finger to help — responsibility dilutes when there are other witnesses around. But the change from witness to involved subject makes all the difference.

    Thank you again for making us think.

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